Your Soul, and How to Swing It: The Moral Distinction Between Kinds of Knowing.

In a previous piece, I discussed the difference between explicit and implicit knowledge. The conversation was situated in a wider context: the context of advertising and behavioural manipulation. In another piece, I mused about the importance of reciprocal-adversarial loops in generating all sorts of interesting systems. I’ve also written about how to avoid letting your verbal/propositional knowledge take over and drown out your experiential/participatory knowledge.

It’s worth noting that I see this piece as fitting in quite neatly with those, and if you like it, I bet you’ll get more out of it from reading the rest.


Today, what I want to talk about is how to balance knowing that something is the case and knowing how it is to be something, in important practical ways. I also want to talk about the danger of not minding your knowing how it is. That way lives evil and madness, I suspect.

I’m sure many of you are familiar with the idea that experts in a certain skill are some of the least likely people to be able to explain how to do it well. I’m sure you’ve seen a friend do something amazing, and then when you ask her how, she’s unable to tell you. This means that it’s possible to be able to do something without being able to describe what you did to get the result.

Continue reading Your Soul, and How to Swing It: The Moral Distinction Between Kinds of Knowing.